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South Atlantic Railroads PDF Print E-mail
Written by Paul Marston   
Tuesday, 18 March 2008 10:38

SOUTH ATLANTIC RAILROAD TRACK CONSTRUCTION FROM 1826 TO 1850

Click on the name of the state to see details

STATE

1826-30

1831-35

1835-40

1841-45

1845-50

TOTALS

CENSUS

CHANGES

Florida

21.00

21.00

21.00

Georgia

238.76

217.96

190.50

647.22

643.72

3.50

North Carolina

2.69

267.50

8.78

278.97

248.50

30.47

South Carolina

10.00

127.00

68.00

84.00

289.00

289.00

Virginia

69.31

242.75

136.86

48.76

497.68

515.15

-17.47

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TOTALS FOR INTERVALS

10.00

199.00

770.01

431.60

323.26

1,733.87

1,717.37

16.50

The Census data shown is for the year 1850 as reported in the 1860 Census.

See www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1860e-06.pdf (pages 230-231).

Why are there differences between our figures and the Census Figures?

Here is an explanation state by state:
  • Georgia:
  1. Macon and Western Railroad - All of the 102 miles of this railroad was reported under this name, but this railroad only built the last 21 miles of it. It purchased the Monroe Railroad and Banking Company at a foreclosure sale. That railroad built the first 81 miles.
  2. Memphis Branch Railroad and Steamboat Company - This was the company that built a 20 mile railroad from Rome, Georgia to a connection with the Great Western and Atlantic Railroad. The 1860 Census does not show this railroad at all for 1850, but only for 1860 under the name Rome and Kingston Railroad. We can find no evidence that it was ever called by that name legally although it was referred to by that name locally and during the Civil War. The name was actually changed to Rome Railroad Company of Georgia in 1850 and that was the name it should have been reported under. The 1880 Census corrected this error on page 351 and showed that it was built in 1848.
  3. Great Western and Atlantic Railroad (GA) - As we have explained elsewhere, 16.5 miles of this railroad was in Tennessee by 1850 leaving only 121.50 for Georgia.
  • North Carolina:
  1. Greenville and Roanoke Railroad (NC) - All of the mileage in this railroad was assigned to Virginia as part of the Petersburg Railroad which acquired it in 1855. The 1860 Census says 80 miles for the two railroads combined, but the 1880 Census says there was only 59 miles. It turns out that this railroad was abandoned in 1877 so the 59 mile figure is just for the Petersburg Railroad. What this tells us is that there were 21 miles in this railroad in 1850, but part of it was in Virginia and part was in North Carolina. How much of the 21 miles was in each one? Since the 1880 Census did not list it, there is no state breakout available. Our fall back position is to reconstruct this railroad in Mapinfo™ and determine these figures. The answer is 12.22 miles in Virginia and 8.78 in North Carolina so 8.78 miles needs to be transferred to North Carolina.
  2. Petersburg Railroad (NC) - This railroad also terminated in North Carolina, but this time the 1880 Census tells us that there were 2.69 of the 59 miles needs to be transferred from Virginia to North Carolina.
  3. Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad (NC) - This was still another railroad that started in Virginia and ended in North Carolina. Once again, the 1880 Census tells us that 19 miles of the 80 mile total need to be transferred to North Carolina.
  4. Wilmington and Raleigh Railroad - We report the 161.50 miles under this name because that is who built it.
  5. Wilmington and Weldon Railroad - The 1860 Census reported that same mileage under this name because that is who owned it in 1860 even though it still had the old name in 1850.
  • Virginia:
    1. Chesterfield Railroad - This was another railroad not in the 1860 Census for the year 1850 because it was abandoned in 1851 when the Richmond and Danville Railroad reached the village of Midlothian where the coal fields were, but up to 1851 we need to add these 13 miles to Virginia.
    2. City Point Railroad - We report this 10 mile railroad under this name because that is who built it, but the 1860 Census reported under South Side Railway because that is who owned it in 1860. Actually in 1850, it was called the Appomattox Railroad.
    3. Greenville and Roanoke Railroad (VA) - Once we deduct the 7.78 miles of this railroad that was in North Carolina from the total of 21 miles, that leaves 12.22 miles still in Virginia.
    4. Louisa Railroad Company - That is who built this 70.07 mile railroad, but by 1860, it was called the Virginia Central Railway so the Census used that name.
    5. Petersburg Railroad (VA) - Once we deduct the 2.69 miles of this railroad that was in North Carolina from the total of 80 miles, that leaves 77.31 miles still in Virginia.
    6. Portsmouth and Roanoke Railroad (VA) - There are two problems here in that 19 miles were in North Carolina leaving 61 for Virginia and the name was the Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad in 1860 which is why the whole 80 were reported under the latter.
    7. Seaboard and Roanoke Railroad - See above.
    8. South Side Railway - See City Point Railroad.
    9. Virginia Central Railway - See Louisa Railroad Company.
  • Table of Adjustments:
RAILROAD CHANGES


Memphis Branch Railroad and Steamboat Co
+20.00
Great Western and Atlantic Railroad -16.50
Chesterfield Railroad
+13.00

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TOTAL ADJUSTMENTS IN SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES
+16.50
Last Updated on Monday, 18 August 2008 21:42
 
 
   
       
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